Most Valuable Trademarks 2013

Consultancy firm Interbrand released its Best Global Brands 2013 list yesterday, announcing that Apple is the most valuable brand in the world. Tech companies make up four of the top five spots on the list. For the first time in the list's 14-year history, Coca-Cola was not listed at the top, falling instead to third after Apple and Google.

Will Trademark Fees Be Lower in the Future?

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has published an invitation for comments regarding the possibility of lower trademark application fees. According to the notice published in the Federal Register, the lower fees would be only for applications filed electronically. The purpose of the lower fees is to incentivize applicants to use the electronic filing system (which reduces the USPTO's costs relative to paper applications).

Are You Intellectual Property-Aware?

Many small and medium business owners don't know the difference between trademark and copyright, patent and trademark, or design patent and trademark--much less which of these types of IP they actually own. As a result, many business owners miss out on the competitive advantages that come hand-in-hand with their IP rights. They miss out on potentially lucrative opportunities because they don't know how to leverage their IP assets. The United State Patent and Trademark Office has recognized this common ailment and come to the rescue with the Intellectual Property Awareness Assessment Tool.

How Strong is Your Brand? (Fanciful Marks)

This is my final blog post in a series discussing the spectrum of distinctiveness and how the spectrum can be used to analyze the relative strength of a trademark. This post is about marks that are fanciful.

How Strong is Your Brand? (Arbitrary Marks)

This is my fifth blog entry in my series detailing the spectrum of distinctiveness and how the spectrum can be used to analyze the relative strength of a trademark. This post is about marks that are arbitrary. I discussed the relatively weaker types of trademarks, generic marks, merely descriptive marks, and suggestive marks, in previous posts.

How Strong is Your Brand? (Suggestive Marks)

In a series of posts, I am discussing the spectrum of distinctiveness, which can be used to evaluate the potential strength of a mark. This post is about marks that are suggestive. I discussed the relatively weaker types of trademarks, generic marks and merely descriptive marks, in previous posts.

How Strong is Your Brand? (Descriptive Marks)

In a series of posts, I am discussing the spectrum of distinctiveness, which can be used to evaluate the potential strength of a mark. This post is about marks that are merely descriptive. Recently, I discussed the weakest type of trademark, the generic mark.

Descriptive marks on the distinctiveness spectrum

The Use of Shame in a Trademark Dispute

One thing that legal counsel should consider when drafting a cease-and-desist letter: be careful with what you write; it could make you famous.

How Strong is Your Brand? (Generic Marks)

Previously, I introduced the concept of the spectrum of distinctiveness, which is a simple sliding scale we use to determine the potential strength of a mark. In this post, I will discuss generic marks, which fall on the left side of the scale:

"Apple" to describe apples are generic.

How Strong is Your Brand?

My clients often ask me to evaluate the strength of their trademarks. While the answer to such a question is never simple because of the many factors that could affect the enforcement of any trademark, we are able to at least predict the general level of protection a mark could receive by determining where the mark falls on the spectrum of distinctiveness.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - trademarks